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20130124
20130201
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
to know him. as well as the united states senate. he is on the farm bills and authored most of the authorization bills. clearly his decision is personal i'm sure. he is frustrated with washington, d.c. and members of both parties are frustrated with the gridlock. the republicans will nominate somebody in main street, but while georgia is the so-called red state, president obama was able to get more than 45% of the vote there. i assume that we are going have a credible democrat who will seek the party's nomination. >> it's interesting that the conservative was afraid that even more conservative republicans may challenge him and he decided time to move on. let's move on ourselves. jeb bush the former florida governor cowrote a piece of the "wall street journal" calling for comprehensive immigration reform among other things, writing this. some tell us makers are calling for piece meal changes such as issuing visas or conferring legal status of immigrants who were brought in as children. congress should avoid such quick ficks and commit itself instead to comprehensive immigrati
the united states senate. >> insane city. his book about the senate. >> the what did you learn today? >> i learned today that my brother-in-law tom, toughest guy i know going through a tough time right now. love you tommy. >> what kind of tough time? >> he got his first day of chemoyesterday. here's to you, buddy. >> that leads me to tell you what i've learned today is what you should learn each day. be grateful for your health. if you've got
you're seeing in the senate and house right now. >> senator daschle, if you parachuted into the united states senate today, newly elected senator, would you recognize the place from the places you group in politically? >> i think you would. i think that obviously the institution itself is still very much intact. we had a discussion of our rules in the last couple of weeks. i think you're going to see the institution continue to evolve. but the basic components are still there, principles are still there. the founding fathers came up with a unique way for everyone to have a role, small states and large states and to contribute. those principles are still there. i'm act which encouraged. howard is right, demographics are changing politics and as they change on immigration, they will change on climate and a number of areas i think the american people will demand senators and congressman find common ground a lot more effectively. we're beginning to see that in the first three weeks of this session. >> let me say also senator and governor dean, the demographics will also change the debt deb
was a united states senator? >> oh, i think he's going to be confirmed. i think he ought to be. he's the president's choice. i think that on some of the issues that people have raised concerns about, he's working for the president's policies, not his own. and i like the fact that he is a decorated war hero himself. going into a pentagon badly in need of more reform, more budget cutting, and who better to do that, than someone with the kind of credibility with the troops that chuck hagel has. >> chuck schumer, speaking of chucks, another chuck, ari, chuck schumer, as you know, a very strong supporter of israel, very tough on iran and its nuclear program. he had a private meeting with hagel, emerged strongly endorsing hagel, saying he'll vote to confirm him. you read that long statement that schumer put out on what he was told by hagel during the course of that private meeting. i rey sum that's reassuring. i assume that's reassuring to you. is it reassuring enough for republicans to vote to confirm him? >> no, i think hagel has broken the land speed record for the most apologies on a
senate, and the united states people in a national discussion of how much taxes, how much spending, how much debt we're going to be able to have and get by and do. and so that is really, really critical, and that process has been gone for four years. we are stumbling from crisis to crisis, secret meeting after secret meeting and secret group after secret group, it has not worked. we ned a public discussion. then we layout how much we're going to spend and how much we are going to tax. bill: doesn't the law say that you have to have a budget? >> bill, it explicitly in the united states code passed in 1974 the senate and the house should pass a budget by april 15th. it should be in the committee marked up by april 1st. those have not been done. and it's just been a direct violation of law. and i've been as you know a big critic of that. it's unthinkable. bill: from new york i've heard you loud and clear. one more think quickly, jack lew treasury secretary. you have said strong words against him. why is he unfit for that job. >> first he went before the public as 2011 as budget director an
committee's ranking republican, orrin hatch. a trio of perpetrators who treat the united states treasury as if it were a cash-and-carry annex of corporate america. the "times" story described how amgen got a huge hidden gift from unnamed members of congress and their staffers. they slipped an eleventh hour loophole into the new year's eve deal that kept the government from going over the fiscal cliff. and when the sun rose in the morning, there it was, a richly embroidered loophole for amgen that will cost taxpayers -- that's you and me -- a cool half a billion dollars. yes, half a billion dollars. amgen is the world's largest biotechnology firm, a drug manufacturer that sells a variety of medications. the little clause secretly sneaked into the fiscal cliff bill gives the company two more years of relief from medicare cost controls for certain drugs used by patients on kidney dialysis. the provision didn't mention amgen by name, but according to reporters lipton and sack, the news that it had been tucked into the fiscal cliff deal "was so welcome that the company's chief executive quick
in the united states and it affects on health and healthcare outcomes and to share my thinking on solutions to to the primary care workforce shortage. there is an enormous literature that has accrued over decades demonstrating that a lack of health insurance is associated with decreased access to healthcare and worse healthcare outcome. subsequent work has built on this evidence. a paper we published in 2009 linking lack of insurance to nearly 45,000 deaths among adults in the u.s. annually. the research is consistent. health insurance leads to significant is tbenefiterss. in an health insurance does not guarantee access to -- at the national level is to bolster our primary care workforce. there is an additional massive body of literature supporting the idea that a primary care improves all sorts of health outcomes and lower costs. he had not seen changes to eliminate the shortage of pcp's in decades. talk about three policy levers that this committee could consider to increase the number of physicians entering into the primary care workforce, some of which have been referred to. at the med
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)